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post #1 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-24-2008, 04:38 PM Thread Starter
 
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My new girl

Well ladies and gentlemen, I have been away from the blog for a while (mainly because it was winter, but also because the last time I was here was a huge argument). My last post on the site was concerning my purchase of a new Daytona 675. Well, I bought it all the way back in October, and I finally picked it up Tuesday.
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What do you esteemed and experienced gentlemen think about the break in period. This is my third bike, but first new one, aand I am not sure what to do about the break-in period.
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post #2 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-24-2008, 04:46 PM
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Break in is one of the most debated topics regarding a new bike. There are generally two schools of thought: "by the book" and the "mototune" method here : http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm. I did the by the book method for my zx-6r. But I've been thinking of doing the mototune method on my next bike. My brother in law is a graduate from Wyotech and he beleives in the mototune method.


Nice bike by the way .

"Let us celebrate our arrangement with the adding of chocolate to milk."
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post #3 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-24-2008, 05:05 PM Thread Starter
 
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Man, thanks for the post. That alternative break-in method is wild stuff. Unfortunately for me, I rode my bike for the first 30 miles doing the easy method, so according to the article it could be too late for me. I'm sitting at 29 or 30 miles right now, and wonder if it's too late to run it hard.
Come on sportbikes.com "oldheads," chime in. I need more advice, and you guys have always been with me in the past.
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post #4 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-25-2008, 03:21 AM
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ryan summed up reality. Those are the two schools of thought. If you're asking who prefers what, I'd recommend doing lots of research to see which you believe in. Since I've not owned a new bike, I have no idea which I'd choose.

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post #5 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-25-2008, 05:07 AM
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My opinion is that it doesn't matter. You will have sold the bike to a newbie who will have wrecked it before any potential differences in break-in method show up. How many bikes make it to 100,000 miles? Your bike was likely redlined before it left the factory, so the manufacturer's procedure is mostly a safety issue to get used to a new bike. Ride it like you want to. It won't matter unless you're racing, and even then rider skill will make much more difference than engine break-in.

Great looking bike, BTW.

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post #6 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-25-2008, 05:57 AM
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I'm a "by-the-booker".

"Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son." - Vernon Wormer.- Dean, Faber College.
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post #7 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-25-2008, 08:50 AM
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Blog?
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post #8 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-25-2008, 09:00 AM
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FYI I've have a background in engine design by education, and I even briefly worked in the field before. My opinion of the Mototune method is that it's totally crap.

I think it's a fine way to quickly break in an engine that isn't going to last very long to begin with. If you race, and rebuild every few thousand miles, fine. Otherwise, you're probably going to turn a 100,000 mile engine into a 10,000 mile one.

Here's the thing - during the breakin period, two things are happening:

1. The parts are mating, polishing, and seating themselves. On the cylinder walls, if you do this too quickly, you eat right through the hone pattern.

2. The steel parts, and to some degree the aluminum parts are work hardening on the surface. This takes some time and if you eat through the very thin work hardened layer that forms, you're into metal that wears rapidly.

So do it slowly and you know you won't have any problems. Do it too quickly and it's a crapshoot. A few years ago GM had to recall and replace a couple dozen of it's Corvette ZR-1 engines all because one throttle happy factory delivery guy took it upon himself to "mototune" a bunch of new Corvettes right off the assembly line.
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post #9 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-25-2008, 09:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mister Tee
FYI I've have a background in engine design by education, and I even briefly worked in the field before. My opinion of the Mototune method is that it's totally crap.

I think it's a fine way to quickly break in an engine that isn't going to last very long to begin with. If you race, and rebuild every few thousand miles, fine. Otherwise, you're probably going to turn a 100,000 mile engine into a 10,000 mile one.

Here's the thing - during the breakin period, two things are happening:

1. The parts are mating, polishing, and seating themselves. On the cylinder walls, if you do this too quickly, you eat right through the hone pattern.

2. The steel parts, and to some degree the aluminum parts are work hardening on the surface. This takes some time and if you eat through the very thin work hardened layer that forms, you're into metal that wears rapidly.

So do it slowly and you know you won't have any problems. Do it too quickly and it's a crapshoot. A few years ago GM had to recall and replace a couple dozen of it's Corvette ZR-1 engines all because one throttle happy factory delivery guy took it upon himself to "mototune" a bunch of new Corvettes right off the assembly line.

Do you also have a degree in Metallurgy?

Your "engine design" education was likely rooted in old school principles taught by the same old school gearheads who write those old school break in manuals. The same old farts who remember when Ethyl was an option at the pumps.

If you've ever been in a modern racing engine shop you'd know that high performance motors are usually run hard through a few heat cycles on the dyno before being released for use/installation in a vehicle.

I'm not advocating on behalf of mototune, just saying that qualifying a new process against an old one is unintelligent.
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post #10 of 24 (permalink) Old 01-25-2008, 10:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Mister Tee

1. The parts are mating, polishing, and seating themselves. On the cylinder walls, if you do this too quickly, you eat right through the hone pattern.
had never thought of that...
guess it depends on what the block is made of though...
my engine in my v6 3.8L camaro is IRON and the new rings I put in were STEEL made by Total Seal




I'm gonna do something NOONE has yet to say and say Thats a SHARP looking bike!!!!
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