makeing a turn technique - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 05:07 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
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makeing a turn technique

when I turn, this is what I do:

1- slow down by pressing both breaks.
2- downshift one or more gears.
3- look.
4- turn
5- engage the clutch
6- roll the throttle.

Yesterday I noticed that when I engage the clutch in a turn, the rear wheal skid a little. I adjusted the chain two days ago. Is it possible that the chain is too tight, or something wrong with my technique?

thanks
JohnE1000 is offline  
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 05:09 AM
 
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Be in the correct gear before you start to trun. For new riders shifting in a trun is not a good idea.

I doubt your chain is to tight. But just check it against the manuel.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 05:48 AM
 
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Its your rear wheel locking up under compression braking. Try not pulling the clutch in as far when you downshift, and letting it out between more then one gear drop.
With some practice, you can blip the gas while the clutch is pulled in to match the rpm to what they are going to come up to when you let out the clutch.

Also, dont turn your bike with the clutch pulled in. You should do all your turning under throttle, at least untill you hit the track.



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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 06:58 AM
jab
 
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All good input. You should not be cluthching, changing gear or breaking in the turn, these should have all been done prior to entering turn. The reason your wheel skidded is because your engine speed did not match your road speed, either because you didnt give the throttle a blip prior to disengaging cluth, or you gave it to much throttle and lost traction. Either of these two scenarios is very dangerous, not only does it negatively effect traction, but also messes with the weight distribution of the bike and that can through you off. Basic rule for anyone that is not a very advanced rider is to have your breaking and shifting done prior to putting in any steering input, then you should be light on the accel through the corner, accel as you exit.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 07:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by jab
All good input. You should not be cluthching, changing gear or breaking in the turn, these should have all been done prior to entering turn.
I always hold in the clutch when I take a turn. Is this a bad idea? It seems to be the easiest way for me to turn and then before I let go of the clutch I bring the rpm's up a bit for a smotth exit when I let go of the clutch. Is this a bad habit that I should try to stop
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 07:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Smith
I always hold in the clutch when I take a turn. Is this a bad idea? It seems to be the easiest way for me to turn and then before I let go of the clutch I bring the rpm's up a bit for a smotth exit when I let go of the clutch. Is this a bad habit that I should try to stop
YES. Untill you are ready for trail braking, you should be accelerating as you lean the bike in, and accelerating the whole way thru a turn. I dont mean a full out assult on the red line, but enough acceleration to transfer weight on the rear tire. The only controls you should be using in a corner is gas and lean. Any brake/clutch inputs will upset your balance.



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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 08:12 AM
 
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Clutch?

Why do anything wit the clutch during a turn.

You have slowed
You are in the right gear
You have looked at the turn
You have leaned
Now roll on the throttle till you are ready to straighten and and speed out. Shift then. Not during or while turning.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 09:12 AM
 
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Have you taken the MSF course? You should take it if not.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 10-10-2005, 10:22 AM
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I used to do that, trust me, not a good idea. Not only there's a chance of locking up the rear or breaking traction easily, but if you over-rev it when releasing the clutch or upshifting, you're looking at bad wheelie or headshake incident while still leaned over.
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