Motorcycle Oil vs. Auto Oil - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-04-2005, 07:40 PM Thread Starter
 
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Motorcycle Oil vs. Auto Oil

I can't remember the site, but I read a long article which basically said motorcycle oil is no different than high grade auto oil (like Mobil 1), and that the oil companies have advertised for so long and so well that the entire motorcycle community has come to believe this falsehood. Sorry long sentence.

Anyway, they even teach at the motorcycle tech schools that motorcycle oil is better--but the recent research points out that it's not.

What do you all think?

I haven't used any auto oil BTW.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-04-2005, 08:09 PM
 
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Hi ESanders2-

The information from that site is completely WRONG on several counts. Motorcycle oil is in a unique environment where it must bathe and lubricate the motor, transmission, and even perform cooling duties on some bikes.

With this in mind, the companies that make motorcycle-specific oils add a sophisticated blend of agents that assist shearing properties, prevent foaming, and generally increase the protection aspects of the oil. Anyone who tells you "oil is oil" isn't being completely truthful. Using proper motorcycle-specific oil is good, cheap insurance for your powerplant. Don't try to cut corners on the lifeblood of your motor.

~ Blue Jays ~
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-04-2005, 08:16 PM
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Sorry for the thread jack, but Happy Birthday Blue Jays.

Me Big Brother, me watching you

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Today is the day of the beginning of your life, ride safe
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-04-2005, 08:21 PM
 
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Hi ga_skyline_rydr-

You're much too kind!

~ Blue Jays ~
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-04-2005, 08:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Blue Jays
Hi ga_skyline_rydr-

You're much too kind!

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I try to notice minute details, that is what the feds pay me to do. I hope I didn't embarass you.

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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-04-2005, 08:29 PM
 
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Hi ga_skyline_rydr-

Not at all embarrassed. Some women absolutely cringe at their birthdays, but I don't mind.

Speaking of birthdays, someone give ESanders2 a couple of quarts of Golden Spectro or Torco motorcycle oil so his brand spankin' new Kawasaki stays in pristine condition!

~ Blue Jays ~
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-05-2005, 03:17 AM
 
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Actually there are studies that show good Auto oils out perform Motorcycle oils in about every aspect, especially in the ones pertaining to the motorcycle environment (wet clutch) such as shear.

Basically do what ever you are comfortable with, but I believe that you are wasting extra money for an inferior product when buying a motorcycle specific oil.

With that said, if you do decide using Auto oil, do your research because you cant just use any oil in a bike.

Personally I use Rotella synthetic, its great stuff.
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-05-2005, 04:26 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Angrypenguin
Actually there are studies that show good Auto oils out perform Motorcycle oils in about every aspect, especially in the ones pertaining to the motorcycle environment (wet clutch) such as shear.
What if you use a good specific motorcycle oil? wouldn’t that be better then a good car oil.

From what I have read the major difference is that regular car oil has friction modifiers, Friction modifiers are no good for wet type clutch. Personally I use redline. It states right on the back that it is designed for wet clutches. I don’t go cheap on the motorcycle oil.

Think about it you just bought one of the big 4 race replica bikes, Do you understand that this bike is ready to race. These bikes’ having redlines, that are now reaching 17,500RPM’s on some bikes. You better believe I want a good oil to protect my engine when its spinning that fast. This is not a cheap hobby. JMO
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-05-2005, 06:53 AM
 
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Hi Angrypenguin-

It is very hard to believe that manufacturers that specialize solely in producing motorcycle-specificant lubricants would still be in business if their products didn't bring demonstrable advantages to the marketplace. If they were the same products inside the bottle, that would have been frontpage news by now.

Here is an excerpt from the Golden Spectro site about the differences between automotive and motorcycle oils:

"....Yes, there is a difference between automobile engines and motorcycle engine requirements. Motorcycles, particularly Japanese designed models, use their engine oils in the transmissions and clutch systems. These applications place unique stress on motorcycle lubricants. The maximum engine output per liter for motorcycles is 1.5 to 1.8 times that of automobile engines. Similarly, the revolutions at maximum output are 1.3 to 2 times that of automobiles. Further, motorcycle engines are small and light weight. This results in a small thermal capacity in motorcycle engines which causes engine oils to reach temperatures as high as 320° F. The above differences logically lead to the point that a motorcycle-specific engine lubricant can be formulated to address the unique requirements of the motorcycle engine. The major modifications would be in using a more shear stable viscosity index improver (VI) which provides viscosity retention when run through the motorcycle transmission gears. Automobile oils using less shear stable VI components which will fall out of grade or suffer viscosity loss rapidly in motorcycle applications. Next, a higher volatility is needed for the higher temperatures to control consumption. Base oils with a higher NOACK volatility are specified for use in motorcycle oil formulations.

Further, due to the high heat and the RPMs motorcycles encounter, ZDDP and phosphorous are needed to prevent cam wear and oil oxidation. Lastly, care must be taken in the choice of friction modifiers in motorcycle oils to prevent clutch, back torque limiter and starter drive slippage. Current auto oils of energy conserving API SJ, SH GF-4 quality contain a large amount of friction modifiers for increased fuel economy as well as limits on zinc and phosphorous content thus limiting their use as motorcycle lubricants. They are fine for auto engine use but can be inappropriate for use in motorcycle engines.

The major Japanese motorcycle manufacturers have developed a series of tests called "JASO T-903" which includes a shear stability, volatility, low and high temp. viscosity and friction clutch lock-up time tests, all of which address the motorcycle specific issues mentioned above. A lubricant manufacturer must complete the required ASTM tests for all of these categories and submit the results to the JASO in order to receive the 'license' for marketing a JASO MA tested oil. This process is designed to make the choice of motorcycle oils easy for consumers and give him or her assurance that the oils are what they need to be for motorcycle use...."


The difference between a "cheap" oil change and an "expensive" one is $20.00 or so. There are people around here lots more technical than me that could explain the JASO intricacies much better. I would call going with the better motorcycle-specific oil a very wise insurance policy.

~ Blue Jays ~
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-05-2005, 07:59 AM Thread Starter
 
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what kind of motorcycle oil do you reccomend then? Is YamaLube a good oil? Also, do I need to change my oil at the 600 mi. AND the 2000 Mi point?? Or can i wait a normal interval after the initial 600 mi oil change?

thanks for all the replies.
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