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post #1 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 10:03 AM Thread Starter
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Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: West Chester PA USA 19382
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I've noticed we have alot of new members on
the site latley and I would like to share a
few things that I think are important and I
wish someone had told me when I first started
riding. If I had been armed with this
information I probably wouldn't have a heal
in 20 pieces and several other arthritic bones
in my right foot.

I've learned that over confidence is a KILLER.
It goes for experts, intermediates, new riders.
Keep yourself in check, don't let your emotions
control your ride, always think first.
Tire Pressure! The largest factor in my worst
accident was tire pressure. Use the factory
specs NOT the tire's sidewall specs.
There's a place and time for all kinds of riding.
Don't be foolish in congested areas. Patience
is definitley a virue when it comes to riding.
Wait for the right place to push your limits
if that's what you want you want to do.
Don't take your eyes off the road!! This one
got me too once - 1 second is too long.
I try to round a road once to check for gravel,
sand etc before I turn around and rail on it.
For bigger bore bikes, chain tension is important
also. To loose and on/off throttle in corner
entry can get hairy.

Ok, that's it, I'm done. Please undertand
I'm not trying to preach, I remind myself of
these things EVERY time I ride, I've seen
and heard of way too many accidents latley,
if any of this advice can help than that
makes my millineum.

Take Care and Enjoy!
Chris


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post #2 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 11:17 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
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That was just so beautiful...{a crying smilie would work here, but I don't know where to find one}




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post #3 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 11:18 AM
 
Join Date: May 2000
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Lightbulb

Definitely a good thread/topic. I would add to this to say that anyone else who has any info for newbies should insert their wisdom. The more info, the less accidents. After what's been happening as of late, it seems like we could ALL use some refresher courses.

Anyway, add to this what you can. It will benefit all of us.

------------------
~Nick
2000 CBR600F4 -
Lost to the Blacktop God. 4,699 miles in under 3 mos. $8,300 worth of damage to my one and only baby. On the brighter side: Can you say 929rr???
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post #4 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 11:49 AM
 
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Let me add another law of sport riding to Chris's list.

Ride ahead of your motorcycle. Dont let your motorcycle ride ahead of you. When you get in over your head you have abandoned the helm and are letting the bike take the lead.

Not to be confused with "scanning" your environment, which is another good technique,
this technique can best be described as keeping your eyes far enough ahead to SEE, PROCESS and REACT to as much of THE TURN that is coming up as possible. (**NOT** the road surface 3 feet in front of your bike!!!)

An example of NOT doing this is "target fixation", as when you are heavy into a turn and suddenly you notice the turn is alot more sharp than you had initially expected, and lookout, a guard rail getting closer and closer.... The technique? Forget about that guard rail and LOOK to where you WANT to go. (around the turn).. you WILL go to what you look at. look at the guard rail and yer there.

This technique, when properly applied, will keep your mind and control well "ahead" of the bike as it flys through the twisties.. YOU are controlling the bike, the bike is not controlling you.

*****If you are hot into a corner, CANT see it, and DONT KNOW the particular road, you ARE setting yourself up for some very probable asphault surfing****

In my first few years of riding I had one pretty destructive accident and several CLOSE calls because of target fixation. I learned the hard way.

Anyone care to help explain this concept more feel free... It is a great one and it will undoubtedly save your hide one day if you ride hard.

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Fear Green.

[This message has been edited by GreenNinja (edited August 16, 2000).]
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post #5 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 11:51 AM
 
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Hey, I've got some good advice- buy yourself a new 600, ride it for a few months, then wreck it (a low-side at 20-30 mph should do it). Voila! now you're ready for that 900+ sportbike you really wanted in the first place!
Sorry Brutha, I couldn't resist.

------------------
'98 Superhawk

[This message has been edited by Tristan (edited August 16, 2000).]
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post #6 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 02:42 PM
 
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Cool

Also, wear the proper gear! Helmet, gloves, riding boots, jacket and pants.

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Dave
Too many curves...so little time
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post #7 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 02:55 PM
jrm
 
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As I've been riding (motos) for only a year, I found Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist-II a very valuable book when I wanted to learn how to go faster and be safe doing it. My wife was not a good conversation partner in these discussions, so the book let me go to class each evening and learn from a pro. I have read it two or three times in the past year and pointed out particular sections I thought my wife could really use. Money well spent.

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post #8 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 03:30 PM
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
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Thumbs up

A technique that I've been practicing with great results is accelerating through corners... even intersections.

I've noticed that just by applying a bit of throttle (just enough to take the weight off the front end) makes your cornering much easier, smoother, and feels safer. I found this to be easier with low revs, and entering the corner slower than normal.

Watch those exit speeds though... they tend to be a lot faster! So be ready for that next corner to come up quickly.

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post #9 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 03:48 PM
 
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Unhappy

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Aril, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Tristan:
Hey, I've got some good advice- buy yourself a new 600, ride it for a few months, then wreck it (a low-side at 20-30 mph should do it). Voila! now you're ready for that 900+ sportbike you really wanted in the first place!
Sorry Brutha, I couldn't resist.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Seriously man, that hurt. I am giving you the benefit of the doubt and assuming there was no ill-intent there. The lack of smilies leads me to believe otherwise, but like I said, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt.

BTW: It was my third street bike and I didn't lowside, I highsided @40mph. Hell, I wish I had lowsided...might still have a ride.

------------------
~Nick
2000 CBR600F4 -
Lost to the Blacktop God. 4,699 miles in under 3 mos. $8,300 worth of damage to my one and only baby. On the brighter side: Can you say 929rr???

[This message has been edited by CBR Brutha (edited August 16, 2000).]
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post #10 of 25 (permalink) Old 08-16-2000, 04:21 PM
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
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Talking

Brutha, I have inserted smilies in my previous post just for you. You've been here long enough that you should be used to my smartass posts by now! If you get a new bike this year, break it in quick so we can hook up for a ride.

------------------
'98 Superhawk
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