Brand new back tire. - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-06-2004, 04:11 AM Thread Starter
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Brand new back tire.

I haven't been on here in awhile, so please forgive me if this is a repeat post of someone elses, but I have a brand new back tire on my bike, and I am looking for the best way to break it in if you can't physically ride the bike right now. For example, are there any liquids or solvents that will take off the new coating so that you can jump right into riding? Thanks in advance for your help!

-Rob

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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-06-2004, 04:51 AM
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I've heard of people using sandpaper to rough it up just a bit, but even if you do that I'd still run a few stress-free miles on it once your riding season starts to make sure it's ready to go. Nothing worse than thinking your tire is sufficiantly scuffed in and then finding out the hard way that it isn't.

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-06-2004, 07:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by spicersh
I've heard of people using sandpaper to rough it up just a bit, but even if you do that I'd still run a few stress-free miles on it once your riding season starts to make sure it's ready to go. Nothing worse than thinking your tire is sufficiantly scuffed in and then finding out the hard way that it isn't.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-14-2004, 04:25 AM
 
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I have never seen such a product to remove anything from a new tire, Because, I think, there is no such thing. I have read on Dunlops site, that , in fact, there is no fabled , slippery, release agent on new tires, or any other 'chemicals'. The general recomendation for new tire break in , is 100 mile of easy riding avoid extreme acceleration, lean angle and braking, because you are riding on a new tire that should have more thread on it than your old used tire, the new tire also has a different profile than your old used tire, and therefore, different riding characteristics.
The tire company's just want you to aclamate(spelling?) yourself to the new tire. Also not getting a new tire up to proper temperature is a major culprit for going down. Here - read this interesting take on the subject.

http://www.parts411.com/acb/webpage....&WebPage_ID=38
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-14-2004, 05:05 AM
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http://more.sportbikes.com/ezine/art...p?articleId=58


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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-14-2004, 10:41 AM
 
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Dont know about dunlop, but i recently got a new avon, and it was defenetly coated with something. i couldnt believe how slick that thing was, it slipped on slow corners and lit up off throutle on perfectly dry and rather hot pavement. but after 50 miles or so it became very sticky and pretty much stayed that way.



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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-14-2004, 04:28 PM
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In a conversation with a tire engineer he did say that they do not use a specific mold release product in tire molds because there is no need. The rubber at heat releases its own oils that accomplish that. End result, the tire can still have a slippery feel but it occurs naturally. Good info for those who make a big issue out of it but either way, they tend to feel slippery. I'm always suspect of the liberal use of assembly rubber lube on the bead during mounting that finds its way all over the tire. I think that has the most potential for trouble in the equation.

I have usually taken my bike home and washed it after mounting tires due to white wheels and very messy hand prints. I did take the time to literally wash the tread area as well as the wheels with the same dishsoap I was washing the bike with. Did it help? Not sure, but it didn't hurt. I don't take any 100 miles break in but excersize a little caution, leaning a little further each bend, and have it adequately run in within 20 miles or so.

Then there's the track. Mount a new tire and give it one or two warmup laps and then let it rip. So, who knows. A little caution can't hurt.

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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-14-2004, 07:25 PM
 
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The main thing on a new tire is how rough the surface is. Since the streets are covered in dust and they arent perfectly flat and even like you might find on the street, you need to give some time for the tire surface to roughen up. Think of normal glass before and after running rough sandpaper on it.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-17-2004, 07:05 AM
 
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Yes slick tires are bad, I had a buddy almost drop his bike cause he was a dumb arse and sprayed armor-all tire black all over his tires and when he pulled out of the driveway is slid on him.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-17-2004, 08:12 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all the advice. The reason I ask is because I tried to break it in a couple months ago, and highsided the som'b*tch! Going around a right turn, it broke loose and I couldn't get control of it. By the time I figured out that it spun loose, I was already rolling on the ground. How do you guys feel about doing a burnout to break it in? That would have the same effect, right?

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