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post #1 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-07-2002, 05:08 PM Thread Starter
 
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Question need some schooling on tight corners

I was riding today on some back roads and ended up in the dirt twice I came into a corner to hot and grabbed a fist full of breaks and ended up checking out some vegitation on the high side of the corner. A mile later the road turns right but you cant tell till your there and there a dirt road that kind of goes strait and looks like the raod at first. Well needless to say i went straight and and enduroed my bike for quite a while. I stopped 5 feet from a pine tree that I thought I was going to hug. This is my delema. When Im cruising a windy highway I can hall ass and feel comfortable setting into the corners. When I get on the back roads I have a hard time comiting to to the corners. I guess its because I'm in tighter corners. I talking 15-20 mph corners with no centerline and the pavement is a little ruff in spots. I just need ed to vent cause twice in the dirt in one day sure can [email protected] up your confidence. Granted I never went down(damn close)Does any one else out there have the same problem or did and figure it out cause I sure could use some advise Thanks .Adam
sticky side down and try to stay put of the dirt
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post #2 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-07-2002, 05:29 PM
 
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Talking Ahhh Grasshoppa........

I'm by NO means an expert rider. Like others, I try to learn something new every day I ride. Even on days I don't ride I might peruse an article on riding or two. Consider yourself among friends here, and don't be bashful about asking. It's how we all learn.

Couple things to keep in mind when agressively cornering:

* Head level
* Look THROUGH the turn
* In slow, out fast
* If in doubt, late apex everything

I'm sure that you've got some riding buddies that'll be more than happy to let you practice with them. After all, practice makes perfect. Also, consider some riding schools, track days, or even a book or two. "A Twist of the Wrist" comes to mind.

Good luck, and don't let your recent "experiences" get in the way of learning how to do it right.
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post #3 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-07-2002, 06:14 PM
 
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I definately agree with the late apexing thing, it gives you more options on blind corners. Also try and get all your braking done before you enter the corner, trail braking will make the bike harder to turn and can give you a sense of going too fast for the corner even if its not the case.
Knowing the road is one of the biggest things too, you're gonna kill yourself if you go in without an idea of what to expect.
Practice transfering your body weight, even a little bit can make the bike feel more confident in the turns.
And if in doubt SLOW DOWN!!!
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post #4 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-07-2002, 07:04 PM Thread Starter
 
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I believe...........

I think problem is my lean meter. After I get to a surtain angle I have a little voice in my head saying ,ahh your getting over a bit far but I know that I'm far from it. I'm sure it takes time to get there . I've ridden a year now and have read "twist of the wrist ll".Its that stupid chicken strip that I have on my tire. It's a 1\8 stripe I can't seem to get scrubbed on my new tire. Sounds like I need a track day I'm all ears for more advise, thanx guys Adam.
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post #5 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-07-2002, 09:22 PM
 
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Looking through (and beyond) the turn where you *want* to be is probably the biggest contributor to getting through corners easier. The road is so much wider and your apparent speed so much less when you are looking as far ahead as you can see as opposed to 4 feet in front of you. The other major contributor to pucker factor is not knowing the road nor what may lie ahead. You may not be riding faster than the bike's capabilities, but you may be riding faster than your reaction/control input capabilities.
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post #6 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-08-2002, 03:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Its that stupid chicken strip that I have on my tire. It's a 1\8 stripe I can't seem to get scrubbed on my new tire.

Don't get caught up in thinking that because a tire doesn't have a"chicken" or weanie stripe, that it means a person is fast. If you read Twist II, then you know that lots of riders use way too much lean angle when riding. While I don't consider myself a pro, I feel I can somewhat hold my own in the tight stuff. I have a few older friends who can pass me- when I am at almost my full lean- on the outside! Using about 1/3 less ground clearance. While leaning makes good photo ops, its the guys who get the bike turned and upright the soonest (to get on the gas quicker) that are the real pros. Also, in my opinion, be happy with that 1/8 of an inch. If you are reaching that steep of angles on the street regularly you should definitely go to the track. It's always the inattentive driver, random pothole, or loose gravel that will eventually catch up with you. Sometimes being the best of rider isn't enough to save you on the streets.
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post #7 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-08-2002, 04:35 AM
 
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Smile Take it 'easy'

If you are on a road you don't know, you REALLY don't know what's ahead. Not to mention gravel, animals or stopped vehicles. Go a little slower, and practice being smooth, you need that more than ever as speed increases.

The other thing to keep in the back of your mind is: "in 95% of all single vehicle motorcycle accidents, the bike was capable of making the corner successfully." It's your brain that panicks and says "oh sh*t". Not an excuse to override your ability, but just lean it over farther (stay on the throttle) and the odds are real good that all you'll suffer is major pucker factor.

Hey, take your time, there is always more to learn, no matter how long you ride.

Be safe, wear your gear.

HTH
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post #8 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-08-2002, 05:06 AM
 
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lean meter

lean meter, I like that. That's my biggest problem. It just takes time to get used to leaning way over... but how much time? I'm still waiting... the tight stuff 15-20mph, that's the worst for me. I don't even enjoy riding roads like that. I'm in hyper awareness, holy shit mode, sphinter so tight it's acting like suction cup on the seat. what does it take to get over that fear of the lean? get me over 30mph and though I'm still not leaning way over, I'm not scared of crashing. the bike feels much more stable at higher speeds, and able to compensate for any mistake I make.

I don't give a damn about my chicken strips, I just want to be faster, like I know I could be.
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post #9 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-08-2002, 05:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by BobbyDazzler
I definately agree with the late apexing thing, it gives you more options on blind corners. Also try and get all your braking done before you enter the corner, trail braking will make the bike harder to turn and can give you a sense of going too fast for the corner even if its not the case.
Knowing the road is one of the biggest things too, you're gonna kill yourself if you go in without an idea of what to expect.
Practice transfering your body weight, even a little bit can make the bike feel more confident in the turns.
And if in doubt SLOW DOWN!!!
lots of good stuff here.

the first you really need to do it slow down. ride a road slow, then a little faster and make mental notes of the changes you saw from slow to medium pace. it may help to ride it slow again, it's time to really get the road into your head. this way corners don't pop on you so fast.

also remember 70-100% of your braking on a streetbike (on the street) is done with the front tire.

Tony

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A braveman stands in front of freedom and defends it for others.


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post #10 of 23 (permalink) Old 07-08-2002, 05:54 AM
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Turn-in point

Along the same lines as the posts that suggest late-apexing, pay close attention to your turn-in point. The tendency is to turn in too soon, putting yourself on a trajectory that leads into the weeds. In the really lame illustration below, note that the blue path requires the rider to slow down and lean over more at mid-corner just to stay on the road. The red path, OTOH, requires just one steering input and no mid-corner braking.

Practice--at a comfortable speed--turning in at a point that permits you to get all your steering done once. Another benefit is that you can get on the throttle sooner, as soon as you're done with that single steering input.

BTW, this is pure Keith Code Twist II. Review his steering principles and the "two-step" technique for a much better explanation than this one.
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