Help Me Work On My Own Bike - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-18-2002, 06:38 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 17
Angry Help Me Work On My Own Bike

I DONT KNOW A LOT ABOUT WORKING ON A BIKE. I HAVE A 93CBR900RR AND I RECENTLY PUT IT IN THE SHOP FOR 6000 MILE SERVICE LIKE THE SERVICE MANUAL THEY HAVE SAID TOO. I ALSO WAS REPLACING THE TIRES WITH NEW BRIDGESTONE BATTLAX TIRES. THIS WAS TUESDAY AND NOW ITS SATURDAY AND I STILL HAVE MY BIKE IN THE SHOP. THEY GAVE ME EXCUSES EVERYDAY ABOUT WHY THEY COULD NOT GET TO IT THAT DAY. I ALREADY HAD THE TIRES WITH ME TAHT I TOOK TO THEM WITH MY BIKE. THE CHARGES ARE $55.00 TO MOUNT AND BALANCE BOTH TIRES AND $65.00 TO SERVICE IT DEPENDING ON HOW MUCH OF THE FARING HAS TO COME OFF. I WANT TO KNOW HOW TO GET A SERVICE MANUAL OR SOME HELP SO I CAN DO THE THINGS MYSELF INSTEAD OF PAYING SOME JERKOFF TO DO IT.
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-18-2002, 07:38 AM
jrm
 
Join Date: May 2000
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$55 to mount your tires isn't that bad, considering they are on the bike and you brought them in yourself. $65 to "service" your bike is a) really expensive oil change or b) really cheap labor, depending on what "service" means.

Assuming I am of "average mechanical ability", I have easily taken care of the following on my bike with the help of a manual

Oil/coolant/brake fluid changes, chain lube + adjustment, spark plug replacement, fork alignment, rear wheel alignment, tire pressure, throttle and clutch cable adjustments. Some are a pain in the butt, but none are hard.

What I think I will end up paying someone to do is the install of new tires (I was quoted $18/each), adjust the valves and maybe change the fork oil when front wheel is getting new tire (since it is off anyway...)

If your bike is not done as promised, you may need to look for a different shop. I have my own service business and would that a shop that can't stick to/stay on schedule may not be the most professional in other respects as well (quality of work).

Manuals can be found at your local dealer, bookstore (order it) or online. If you are a rookie mechanic, buy your stuff locally. Pick a shop that sells accessories (helmets, parts, manuals...) and begin to support them. When you run into trouble, they may help you out if they recognize you from your frequent trips to their cash regsiter. You are far more likely to get the help/info you need if you have a good relationship with them.
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-18-2002, 08:03 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
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JEEZZZZ, widowmaker. What a bunch of jerks! $65 plus $55??? No fairings need to come off just to remove your wheels.

Here is what I recommend. Buy front and rear bike stands and remove the wheel/tire assemblies yourself. Depending on the stands you buy, they just paid for themselves.

Remove the balancing weights from the wheels BEFORE you hand them over so they won't remove them with a SCREWDRIVER and scratch your rim. (don't ask me how I learned that trick)

Inspect the assemblies to make sure you keep the sprocket and any other things that might fall out. Remember where it all goes, though.

Personally I use Woodcraft stands. They have a front stand that holds the bike up by the triple clamps so you can also remove the front forks without having to tie your bike to the rafters of your garage. That should help when you have your fork oil changed. Just walk up, put them on the counter and say "how much?"

The front stand requires a special pin that fits you particular triple clamps and can be replaced if you buy a new bike.

www.woodcraft-cfm.com

I hope this helps.
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-18-2002, 11:04 AM
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Re: Help Me Work On My Own Bike

Quote:
Originally posted by widowmaker
I want to know how to get a service manual or some help so I can do the things myself instead of paying some jerkoff to do it.
Your owners manual has a maintenance schedule and instructions for the most basic jobs, such as adjusting the chain, changing oil, and removing wheels. If you don't have an owner's manual, get one from a dealer or from Helm Inc. For anything more involved, get the Honda service manual, available from the same sources.

In addition to the model-specific service manual, Honda also offers the Common Service Manual, which covers operating and maintenance principles in a more general way.

A really, really good book on maintenance basics is Motorcycle Owner's Manual by Hugo Wilson (available from Whitehorse Press. It's thin but well illustrated and limited to maintenance and simple repairs. However, it's generic, so it can't replace the Honda manual.

Working on a motorcycle is much easier than many riders think. Basically, it's held together by threaded fasteners that can be easily removed and installed using tools available from Sears. The Honda Service Manual will tell you what bits have to be taken off to do any particular job. Take your timeŚlots of time if you need it; use proper tools; work in a quiet, well-lighted space so you can see and think about what you're doing; and start out small to build confidence. After you've worked on your own bike for a while, you'll no longer trust it to someone who's just trying to finish the job as fast as he can and get on to the next one.
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 05-18-2002, 01:20 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
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jrm has given you a very good tip.

Establish a contact with your local m/c shop & buy some of the items from them along with letting them do some of the work when it is to far in advance to you or you do not have the necessary tools YET.
From them you will be able to pick up tips & soon be able to do many of the jobs yourself.
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