Laying a bike down - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
View Poll Results: Laying a bike down is a viable survival strategy.
I agree. 10 23.81%
I'd rather stay on, and in control. 30 71.43%
I don't have a clue. 2 4.76%
Voters: 42. You may not vote on this poll

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post #1 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 03:09 AM Thread Starter
 
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Question Laying a bike down

Nothing raises my hackles like when somebody says "blah blah blah so I had to lay the bike down."

They never seem to remember the rest of the sentence which should be "because I couldn't think of anything else to do".

Options are always better if you stay on the bike and use the phenominal abilities of this machine to avoid, or at the very least, minimize the severity of the impending accident.

Sure there are times when you crash. Someone pulls out in front of you from behind a blind, left turn across your lane, and so forth.

I just can't think of a single circumstance where laying the bike down is the best thing to do.

Can you?
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post #2 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 04:14 AM
 
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I can....

When people say "blah blah blah so I had to lay the bike down.", it's usually because they were already in the process of a locked rear wheel slide gone sideways, and they had to choose between laying it down or hi-siding, former being the less severe injury-prone. Nobody purposefully lays a bike down when they have control over it, but some times you have to in order to avoid hi-siding.
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post #3 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 04:40 AM
 
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Yep, there can be times when you are so far into low-siding from either excessive rear wheel spin or locked rear brakes that trying to recover would likely result in a high-side. It normally means that you failed to follow one or more of the basic tenets of street riding when that happens, though.
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post #4 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 04:50 AM
 
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Re: Laying a bike down

Quote:
Originally posted by Busa Buzz
Options are always better if you stay on the bike and use the phenominal abilities of this machine to avoid, or at the very least, minimize the severity of the impending accident.
Sometimes the best way to avoid serious injury or even death is to lay the bike down to avoid the cell-phone yackin' soccermom who just pulled out in front of you. I don't know about you, but I'd rather roll underneath an Excursion then into the side of it. However, and this is all too obvious to any semi-conscious person: the preference is to stay on the bike and not have to worry about any of this. Did we really need a poll to say that???

P.S. A friend of mine is alive today because he layed his bike down when a schoolbus pulled out in front of him and a riding buddy. Unfortunately, the riding buddy didn't have time to do the same. He's dead now.

Last edited by CBR_Brutha; 05-10-2002 at 05:03 AM.
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post #5 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 04:59 AM
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people and motorcycles decelerate better on rubber than they do on plastic, leather, jeans or skin.

there's times when i could see laying 'er down, like to avoid a highside, by giving it gas to low side it, it is a recovery skill. other than that, i can't of a single instance i would throw a bike on the ground.

Tony

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post #6 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 06:58 AM Thread Starter
 
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I started this post becasue I've heard other folks say:" this car pulled out in front of me and I had to lay it down" regarding an accident in a residential area (30MPH max).

My assertion was that, at that speed you should have been able to slow then swerve around the car.

This lead to a discussion about how how laying a bike down is a vital survival skill on a bike and that it should be taught in the MSF schools etc.

I agree that if you are low siding and you can't correct by steering due to the simple fact that the track/road isn't cooperating by turning the way you need it to then you may have to let it go. Hopefully, looking thru the retrospectoscope you'll get a clue why it happened and it will be a once in a lifetime adventure.

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post #7 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 06:19 PM
 
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Have been forced OFF THE ROAD ----

----still I did NOT lay down my bike(s) & rode it out in the ditch to make it back on the road again. Had I given up & laid the bike down then serious damage would have come to the bike & to myself as all came on to fast to plan out what to do next. Mind you some of this aim to stay with the bike comes from days of riding in dirt comp. Like some fellow road racers I have gone off the pavement (proof that I have had this happen more then once) & as we did not had "kitty litter" to slow us down I made it through the "rhubarb" as we called it, & back onto the circuit.
Once when forced off the road, doing around 80 mph, by a cage I was struggling with a terrible wobble (what many might have called a 'tank slapper' but not so as I have had a lot of 'tank slappers' in the earlier yrs) I knew within seconds I was going to hit a power-powel yet actually managed to make it back onto the pavement with quite a hop out of the ditch back onto the pavement & just missed the power pole, yet had I laid the bike down I would have ended up stopping darn fast as I hit the power-pole. So a sportbike can make it though the rough, with some experience, luck & determination.
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post #8 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 09:27 PM
 
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If you are laying a bike down in most circumstances you have stopped thinking & will not be able to avoid an accident. Indeed you are planning an accident. The technology in todays bikes with their brakes & quick steering response can see you through many things. I remember the days when we had crash bars on our bikes & there was a school of thought that believed you could lay a bike down & ride on the side of your sliding machine without damaging the bike or yourself too much. I perfer to rely on my skills & experience.
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post #9 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-10-2002, 11:34 PM
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I know someone who avoided serious injury because he laid his bike down.

A drunk idiot in a jacked up, tractor tire equiped pick up turned left in front of him. The truck driver saw him and stopped. The motorcyclist could not get the bike stopped so he laid it down and slid all the way underneath the truck and stopped on the other side clear of the truck.

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post #10 of 37 (permalink) Old 05-13-2002, 05:08 AM Thread Starter
 
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Luckiest man alive...

Fatman you should have said:" I know someone who was so lucky that they avoided serious injury even though he laid his bike down. "

Odds of being able to slide under another vehicle and escape injury are remarkably slim.

Even if the truck was blocking the whole road I'd be willing to bet a reasonably skilled rider could swerve around the truck. This would have saved him some downtime (not to mention $).

I like the previous comment about focusing on how to avoid an accident rather than planning on how the accident is going to go.

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