Who here has read "A Twist Of The Wrist 2"? - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 07:58 AM Thread Starter
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Question Who here has read "A Twist Of The Wrist 2"?

I was just wondering. I just bought it...yeah, I know, I've been riding for 5 years and I'm just now buying this book....and I was curious if you who have read it found very helpful? I've always heard good things about and I'm sure the basic principles still apply even though the book was written in 1993. What are your views on it? Thanks.

"Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake."
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post #2 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 08:04 AM
 
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I started to read the first one. And although some things I've found very usefull, specifically reference points, I got bogged down in Code's grammatical attempts to sound technical. I hope the second one is better. If it is, I'll have to go pick it up.
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post #3 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 08:10 AM
 
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I don't know what the big deal is with Keith Code. I think his books are garbage. I found that the first book makes better kindling than the second one, if that helps any?
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post #4 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 08:11 AM
 
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I am reading TOTW2 right now and it's pretty informative but the biggest part is trying to keep those things in mind when you get out on the road. Trying to remember all of it.
One stupid thing is he has a list of defined words at the end of certain sections but they aren't even motorcycle terms. Most of them are just normal words that I guess Keith didn't know so he defined them thinking that other people wouldn't know either. Seems odd and out of place.
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post #5 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 08:24 AM
 
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I read the first one long, long ago. Really all it does is make you think about what you're already doing. For a green beginner, I'd say buy it. If you've been riding for a while, I'm not so sure I'd bother.
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post #6 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 08:48 AM
 
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Skip the first TOTW, go directly to TOTW2

I found going back and rereading TOTW2 helped improve my lap times after 5+ years of "successful" racing. Getting back to the basics made me rethink some corners where I wasn't gaining any ground on my competitors. I started to get complacent with success and it stagnated my learning curve, which in turn stagnated my lap times.

I decided if I stayed in the same class it would be cherry-picking so I purchased a bigger bike. What worked with the smaller bike and talent pool, no longer held water as I was now only top 10 instead of winning. Once I went back to principles, practiced them, I started winning that class as well.

Was reading Codes the only reason for success? No, but it did get me to stop some bad habits that worked against less experienced riders but did hold water against national caliber riders. I would recommend TOTW2 as just another tool that might fix some things but not everything. Now on the other hand a 15lb sledge hammer will fix everything.
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post #7 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 08:49 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally posted by Wet Shrub

One stupid thing is he has a list of defined words at the end of certain sections but they aren't even motorcycle terms. Most of them are just normal words that I guess Keith didn't know so he defined them thinking that other people wouldn't know either. Seems odd and out of place.
I have now completed the first 2 chapters and I see what you mean. The definition thing is way out of place.

Quote:
By "tigerblade":

I read the first one long, long ago. Really all it does is make you think about what you're already doing. For a green beginner, I'd say buy it. If you've been riding for a while, I'm not so sure I'd bother.
Yeah, I bought the book because I thought it was supposed to be informative on racing maneuvers and a racer's thought process while on the track, but so far the first 2 chapters sound more like a MSF course instruction booklet or something. Maybe it'll get better. I might learn something, ya never know.

"Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake."
- Napoleon Bonaparte

"The object of war is not to die for your country but to make the other bastard die for his. "
- General George Patton
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post #8 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 09:01 AM
 
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I have TOTW2 video. I got it when I got back into sportbikes and found it somewhat useful. As said before, its hard to keep all the points in mind when on the road.

I think a track school day would be better overall, but at a greater expense..

I dunno, I guess it was worth the $20 bucks or whatever it was.
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post #9 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 09:10 AM
 
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I found that by keeping an open mind and extracting the information from TOTW II, I was able to apply alot of Codes techniques to my riding...

Interesting to compare Freddie Spencer's school of cornering thought with Code's, and apply what works for you...
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post #10 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2001, 09:15 AM
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I am not aware of any other riding books available. I recommend them because they at least lay out an organized approach to things with sound, basic information. I think it can dramatically shorten the learning curve for any rider who is new to pushing the limits a little, and may prevent him from doing something real dangerous while gaining experience. The second book has more specific technique than the first.

The one that's really out in left field is Soft Science of Motorcycle Racing. I wouldn't recommend that one unless you're trying to start some kind of dianetics/cycle/religious cult. I think it has a coupon in the back to mail in for a free insence burner.

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